Wednesday, April 30, 2008

Tomorrow is the first day of May, You have until May 9th to send in your checks if you are attending the Spring Luncheon at the Swan Club. Don't delay time is running short.

Tony Casola
Two new photos added to the Page 11 Photo Reminiscences collection.
Last one courtesy of Harold Schutzman.
Click here --> Page 11

Monday, April 21, 2008

Hi Gene..

It was not a long winded "rant".
We can only hope more maintenance men would do the same.
There must be some still around.

Regards,
Harold

P.S. We also would like to hear from some who are still with C.B.S.

Sunday, April 20, 2008

Can anyone help Ronald?

Greetings,

I just happened across your site. What a wonderful ride down memory lane. Having worked as a desk assistant with Network Radio's Broadcast Operations Department at the Broadcast Center 1972-1974 I was priviledge to have met many technicians, staff announcers, associate directors and others. What a bunch of characters. Was wondering if anyone could tell me the whereabouts of such luminaries as Mort Goldberg, Keith Park(s), Joe Kuhlen, Joe Alonso, Fred Hymes, Fred Himes, Ed Harley, Steve Mendelsohn (spelling?), Bud Arnow, Tom Sheehy, Charlie Krumm (Crumm?), and that's just the names I can immediately recall. Many are probably gone now but would love to get in touch with those still around and kicking. The same goes for the announcing and director staffs. I am especially anxious to contact to Lee Jordan. Thanks for your time and consideration.


Ronald Landskroner
Email - npauthor@earthlink.net
Oakland, CA

Saturday, April 19, 2008

Sad news:
I am sorry to inform you that Sandy Bell's wife, Gloria passed away on April 17th. I have no other particulars.

Sandy Bell ----
Email snoball12@verizon.net
Tel. 973-338-8719
Hello Harold-Sorry for the delayed response, but I've been battling the Flu the last 10 days or so----

Funny you should mention Freddie Reinhart's name , as a matter of fact he
was a close friend of mine ,and he lived five minutes away from me here in Middle Village...I was even lucky enough to be invited to go hunting with him at his house upstate....In knowing him, I'm sure you recognized what great talent this man had and how much he contributed to CBS....

Yes Harold, I certainly knew Ernie Lowe ----I worked in his Dept. when he
was the Audio Supervisor---a real gentleman and great guy to work with....I was fortunate enough to take over the Dept. when he retired.....worked with great group of guys----

At this point Harold, I think it would be safe to say that I'd probably recognize and remember you when I saw you----There were so many people there at work that I knew "by sight"...

Getting back to Audio-----

Yes it's true that gentleman like Billy Taylor and Al Bressan were recognized as great "Audio Men", but what's also true is that they were basically responsible for the mixing, balance, and selection and placement of microphones....Which of course is the important factor as to how the final "product" turns out ---

In the "background", things like the Console, Ampex audio and video
tape recorders, sound monitoring system in the Control Room, the path of house audio through EC, PC rooms, Master Control Etc.,Etc- All had to meet specs regarding frequency response, noise and distortion.........Of course we had the "advantage" that TV audio is FM.....Quality of audio was by no means an "automatic happening"---.

Going back to Radio for a bit (AM): even in the days when tubes and transistors were being used, the FCC required that frequency responses, noise and distortion measurements be made to insure meeting SPECS.-Even though the Broadcast Quality sound leaving the "plant" rarely "made it" to your ear---

To conclude a long winded "rant", Technical Maintenance was responsible for the Broadcast Quality of sound that got to your home....All new equipment was checked before going into service...At one time "Proof of Performance" tests were made at 2am when we were off the air .....However with the New Technology, "Specs" are more easily met....

Goody, most modern sets have Audio Outputs that you can feed into
your High Fi System . But that's only going to emphasize the level differences even more-----

Regards,

Gene Pasculli

PS----Let's not forget all the Maintenance men in Video, Camera, control, Videotape, Outside Studios, Field shop, EC.----Etc. ,Etc. Thank you all----

Friday, April 18, 2008

"Frank,

I don't recall any gas masks charged to my credit card but I do remember.
There was a massive telephone strike in "Chicago during that convention
and we only had radio communication. I was the remote producer at the stockyards ..
"Al Thaler and his "Thaler Raiders" was the producer on the new flash unit outside of
the Hilton Hotel when the riots started and the police started throwing tear gas.
"Al bellowed on the radio there is tear gas and I only have seven gas masks and I have ten people ,
what can I do?" I turned to "Casey Davidson my co producer and said,
"Casey did you hear that?" and he said "yeah".
I thought for a moment and replied "Al, give what you have to all the Jewish guys".
A true story and quoted for many years.
Anybody know the where Al Thaler might be?

Sid Kaufman

Tuesday, April 15, 2008

Dave,

Sorry to report that Joe McCormick long time CBS video man passed away on April 6th this year.
The information I have is very limited but Mike McGrath may be able to supply more.
He can be reached at 845- 359 6388.

Bob Vernum
I remember in studio 41 grand central there was a western electric clock that had a wire going to it.
When the clock showed the time on the hour, the second hand often went past
the hour and then you heard a whurr and the second hand would return to the hour.
And then you knew you were live on the air. I don't remember seeing a clock like this one anywere else.

Cal Marotta
DAVE,

I BELIEVE THAT CONTOURS OUT OF GREEN WAS AN EARLY ATTEMPT TO ENHANCE PICTURE OF NORELCO PC-70 CAMERAS. A PORTION OF THE GREEN SIGNAL COULD BE ADJUSTED AT MODULE ON CCU. EARLY VERSIONS OF PC-60 AND PC-70 WITHOUT ENHANCEMENT PRODUCED SOFT PICTURES UNTIL PROBLEM WAS SOLVED.
SID,

THE CHARGES TO YOUR CREDIT CARD WERE FOR GAS MASKS PROVIDED BY MEDCO DURING 1968 DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION.
PLEASE READ THE FINE PRINT.
REGARDS,
FRANK NOVACK


Yes, Contours out of green was the original name of the "Image Enhancer."
It involved the use of 1H and 2H glass delay lines. When it was first used
on air at the B.C., Cronkite didn't like it because it made the lines on his
forehead stand out! Viewers were also surprised to see a shot of a snowfall,
but there weren't any snowflakes coming down... the image enhancer had
made them disappear! After that, they were very careful about adjusting the
amount of enhancement provided!

Dave

Monday, April 14, 2008

Dave,

The relays that were used to switch A/V in EC areas were IBM wire relays which MAX energized.
They came in many configurations 4-8-12-24 and I believe 48 contact units.
They were Normally-open and Normally closed on each contact (spdt).
I couldn't remember FAVAG!

Regards,
Harry Charles


P.S. They were Lap and Gap relays..
Lap = Make before Break
Gap = Break before make

Dave

Sunday, April 13, 2008

Hi Dave,

Do you mean one of the Swiss jobs like this (see attached photo.) Who was the US distributor for the Favag?
Did you forget such things as FAX assignments? or DIVCON?
What company made up all of those relays used for switching A/V In all studios, MAX, TX, PC?
To answer a question you asked a while back; no, we are not fishing anymore
and due to HOA covenant restrictions we had to also cease the tropical fruit growing after our last move.

Les and Jackie




Hi Les,
Yes, but of course, during our time, they weren't quartz!
I'll answer one of others - Favag stuff was distributed by Beaveronics, as I recall,
and the contact was Bob Striker...
I'll leave the other questions to our loyal group to answer!
--I can still taste that smoked King Fish...

Dave
I just had a very nice phone conversation with Domingo Gutierrez.
Dom is in Ellington, Fla. and is still in a period of mourning for his
wife, Flora, who passed away on Dec. 10, 2007. She was born in
Brooklyn on October 23, 1927, and they were married for 57 years.

Dom is keeping active playing ball and bike riding, and he is doing
some volunteer work for the local hospice.

He says he misses the "old gang" and may try to make a luncheon
in Florida now that he can travel more easily.

If anyone would like to speak with Dom, he can be reached at:
(941) 729 5681.

Dave
max = master assignment exchange
Harry Peterson

Friday, April 11, 2008

Here are some items I've come across that can help those
of us who are taking medication...

Cut Your Costs in Half by Using a Pill Splitter.

Most pharmacies should stock pill splitters. Sometimes, medications can be broken in half and save you 50%. The reason is because several pharmaceutical manufacturers price some of their medications the same for all strengths, i.e. Lipitor is essentially the same price for all strengths. It is possible to save as much as $100 on a one month supply of Lipitor just by getting the larger strength and cutting in half. Ask your pharmacist.
This method may not be appropriate for all medications and could be dangerous if used with the wrong medication. Begin by asking your doctor or pharmacist if your medication is available in a dose double your normal dosage (if you usually take a 20 mg. pill, is a 40 mg. pill available?). If it is, ask whether there would be any problems with splitting the tablets or capsules. Now, do a cost comparison between the two dosages. If the higher dose is less than double the cost for your regular dose then you will be saving money by having your doctor prescribe the higher dose and then splitting it. Cost savings is typically 32% to 50%. Check with your pharmacist to see if your pills can be easily split.

Save by Buying a 90 vs. 30-Day Supply.

Most pharmacies have higher savings on a longer days supply. In addition, when it comes to people who have insurance prescription coverage, there may be other savings by getting a larger day supply. For instance, if you have a $10 co-pay, the insurance company will let you get only a 30 days supply in general for that $10. A 90-day supply bought without insurance may only cost you $18. This would be much cheaper than paying $10 per month ($30 for 90 days). It would also save you two trips to the pharmacy.

Get Only a 7-day Supply of New Medication.

If the doctor does not have samples, ask your pharmacist to give you only a one-week supply to try. It is a federal law that medicines can't be returned once they are dispensed. If you get a month's supply and can't tolerate the medicine, you have just lost that money.


Ask Your Doctor for Samples at Every Visit.

Cross the Border.

If you live close to either Canada or Mexico, you can buy some medications in either country for 75% off the U.S. price.

Senior Discount Card Programs.

GlaxoSmithKline's The Orange Card (888) 672-6436. Covers all GSK's drugs. Must have an annual income below $30,000 per individual or $40,000 per couple. 30% average savings at participating pharmacies.

Eli Lilly's LillyAnswers Card (877) 795-4559. Covers all Lilly drugs except controlled substances. Must have an annual income below $18,000 per individual or $24,000 per couple. $12 co-pay per prescription for 30-day supply.

Novartis' CareCard call (866) 974-2273. Covers select Novartis drugs. Tier 1 must have an annual income below $18,000 per individual or $24,000 per couple. $12 Co-pay per prescription for 30-day supply. Tier 2 must have an annual income below $26,000 per individual or $35,000 per couple. Receive a 25% or more discount.

Pfizer's The Share Card call (800) 717-6005. Covers all Pfizer's drugs. Must have an annual income below $18,000 per individual or $24,000 per couple. $15 co-pay per prescription for 30-day supply.

Together Rx Card (800) 865-7211. Over 150 select drugs from a group of manufacturers. Must have an annual income below $28,000 per individual or $38,000 per couple. Savings of approximately 20-40% off the amount you usually pay for prescriptions and, in many cases, substantially more.

Dave

Wednesday, April 09, 2008


Hi Dave,

I'll pick the ones I'm familiar with:

Aquadag...the outside coating of a TV picture tube.
EC...Equiptment Center.
PC...Production Center.
MAX... main switching center at BC..Broadcast Center.
The relays were constructed by Canadian Marconi.
(my cousin was VP of Canadian Marconi but he was not there at the time BC was constructed.)

Harold Schutzman
Our latest newsletter is now online. It has all the necessary information
regarding the upcoming May 14, 2008 luncheon at the Swan Club on L.I.
Click here for the Newsletter

Monday, April 07, 2008

ANYONE ELSE HAVING TROUBLE WITH MEDCO... I HAVE, I GET STATEMENTS FROM TWO DIFFERENT
OFFICES THAT I OWE MONEY WHILE MY CREDIT CARD HAS BEEN ON THEIR FILE FOR YEARS.
ALSO, I JUST GOT A PRESCRIPTION OF 165 PILLS IN 5 DIFFERENT JARS, WHCIH PRESENTS A STORAGE PROBLEM.
FOUND EXPRESS PAHARMACY MUCH EASIER TO DEAL WITH..
IF YOU HAVE SIMILAR PROBLEMS CALL CBS PERONNEL BENEFITS AND COMPLAIN,
THEY PAY GOOD MONEY FOR THIS SERVICE.

SID K
Gene Pasculli---

I HAVE BEEN LED TO BELIEVE THEY SPEED UP THE TAPE ON COMMERCIAL RECORDINGS WHICH GIVE A PRESENCE OF
LOUDNESS THAT CANNOT BE MEASURED ON A VU METER. IS THAT TRUE?

SID K.

Sunday, April 06, 2008

Hello Gene,

I started with CBS in 1949 and was assigned to studio maintenance in Grand Central. My boss was Freddie Reinhart. After several years I was sent to maintenance in color studio 72. When color shut down, I transferred to the equipment center at 57th street. The camera's at the time were black and white Marconi's and the film chains were black and white vidicons. After some time CBS purchased Norelco PC-70's and GE 4V color film chains. I was with CBS for 23 years and retired in 1973. I mention this for all the newcomers to the site who may not have any experience with CBS, but may be interested in it's history. We oldtimers can wax nostalgic about the Iconoscope days, but we would also be interested in seeing pictures and hearing information from current CBS employees about the new digital technology.Your observations about audio levels are 100% correct. You mentioned there is more interest in bigger screens than audio. Digital TV presents it's own share of problems. The bigger the screen the more apparent the compression artifacts. Another problem is the fact that much of the source material is not shot in native HD, but rather upconverted from standard definition analog, which looks lousy.P.S. By the way, in the Grand Central days I worked with Ernie Lowe and I understand he went to the audio shop at the Broadcast Center. Did you know him, and, since the shop was just down the hall from EC how is it we never met?

Regards,
Harold
OK. Now for you "techies" out there...
Let's see who can give me the definition
or usage for these terms:

Telop, Lobster Crawl, VideoScene, LGBK, U7,
Piclear, Aquadag, 2FA, 2FP, contours out of green,
EC, PC, CC, MAX, STL.

What was the name of the company that supplied
the studio clocks to the B.C? Who is it named for?

What was the Ajax control on the Grass Valley Group
equipment used for?

I have many more of these, but how about input from
others? Maybe special production terms, lighting, etc?

Dave



Saturday, April 05, 2008

I was a Tech in PC for a while & even with the Audimax, the audible sound levels were all over the lot. I constantly had to ride audio. I believe one of the problems is compression. Although the meter says you're peaking zero your ear is telling you it's too loud. I don't pretend to know a great deal about this so if someone wants to explain I'd like to read it. Please the "Audio For Dummies" version not the Wikipedia one. The other thing is that in most television sets the speakers are small, quite often 3". They are not really capable of reproducing the sound quality the audio man, in most cases, produces in his booth enjoying huge speakers & sophisticated amplification systems,
( SHADES OF AL BRESSON & BILLY TAYLOR). Is there an easy way to hook up a pair of decent outboard speakers? And would it make any difference? If you hook up your TV to a stereo sound system will that make much of a difference? Does anyone think the sound quality will improve with the advent of the digital conversion? Although it's called "Television" I would venture a guess that people spend almost as much time listening, without seeing. My wife is legally blind, she sees some movement & shadows, without decent sound she has nothing. Will the television manufacturers ever wake & listen? Realize that television is really RADIO WITH PICTURES? Half the features are too dark to actually see anyway. Pictures like SEVEN which I believe was lit with a 60 watt bulb or the Predator films. Even the cop shows are doing the low light bit. I guess they are being GREEN & saving energy. I've taken to putting on captioning so I can follow what's going on. Sorry for running on, where I live I don't get to speak to many people so I really enjoy these pages & memories. Thank you.
Goody (
goodyfreed@yahoo.com)

Friday, April 04, 2008

An Observation:
I've followed the many "items" on the Net. Regarding all the great experiences our retirees have relived, in most cases very favorable, and the kind of stuff that fond memories are made of ---both of people and the "never to forget" work experiences . I've always been tempted to relate a feeling many people I know as friends and relatives share about television today......At this point I'd like to say what prompted me to finally sit down and put it "on paper" was the statement from Harold Deppe and "stuff" that Gady has put on the Net from time to time....

I've heard about Harold Deppe but never had the pleasure of making his acquaintance. This is probably due to the fact that he was in Operations and or Field and I was in Audio Maintenance in the Production Center. Gady I know from his College Days . Anyway, Harold asked if there where "any Maintenance men out there " and why weren't they being heard from . Well here we are....I was one of the many Audio Maintenance Supervisors over the years.
Anyway, to get to the point of my statement about TV today. I think we all remember the "Big Move" in Audio when Stereo was introduced..... and how popular it was .....Then let's move to the days when you "got up to change your TV channel, set the volume control and satback and enjoyed....(Here's where my grandson would say, "you mean you had to get up to change the Channel") The point to be made here is that you rarely had to adjust audio between channels, and the level never changed when going from program to commercial ....
At that time a gentleman by the name of Fred Schutz was in charge of technical maintenance, and he made jolly well sure we had the Audiomax units (Loudness Control) in the P.C. rooms working properly. Changes from program to commercial were tolerable. Now, if I haven't lost you or "tuned" you out----"Our" big gripe is, no one cares about audio levels or quality anymore....FCC where areYou? You go from one channel. to another and you have to adjust the"Remote" audio-----many times program audio is LOW so you raise thelevel to a comfortable level--------but now the commercial comes on---and "blows you out of the room". Good thing remote controls were developed.

Thank you for reading this-----And as we often say in the E-mail world if you agree pass it on, if not, delete it.

Gene Pasculli

PS. Now we are hung-up on how large a picture we can get on HDTV. Who cares about the AUDIO......

Thursday, April 03, 2008

Hello Ted & Tony,

I was sent this URL from a friend who is Maint. Supv'r. at KYW-TV in Phila. (now a CBS O&O) and thought you might wish to look at the photos.
Getting near time for the annual WCAU Prime Time Club gathering of retirees on June 4th. Our final annual Florida Reunion took place in Feb.
after being held for twenty (20) years. Lack of attendance caused its demise.
Best wishes,
Charlie Higgins
Former Tech and & Retiree of WCAU-TV
Former Pres. IBEW LU# 1241


Most of these photos that are CBS related are already in our Collection,
however, there are 350 photos in the Degan Collection which include many stations across the country.

Dave
Harry,

Nice to hear from you. You are one of the early members of video tape when it was located on the seventh floor in Grand Central Station.
I think you, Jimmy Teevan, Art Buckner and Walter Matchicwuk, transferred from radio to VT at the same time.

Vinny Castrataro