Saturday, June 08, 2002

June 6th, as December 7th, were supposed to be, "Days that will live in infamy." The sad fact of the matter is, not many people these days, recollect the significance about the events that made these days trigger points for recognition.
June 6th is immortalized as the day, Private Ryan a soldier, got lost in a movie, that Tom Hanks, lost his life finding him. December 7th, and all the other dates, are now relegated to the memory banks of the different veteran organizations. Of course, the new date of September 11th, or more colloquially stated as, "Nine-eleven" has overpowered our thinking. The enormity of the event, and too, because it was on our home turf, make it indelibly etched on our minds and psyche, for generations to come.
If I feel a little maudlin about the history of my generation, it is because of the small part that other CBS' ers and I played. But, as the saying goes, "There aren't any small parts only small players." Consider too, that we don't remember with any clarity the events of the Civil War, that had such horrendous numbers of dead in one battle, and on one field, here in the United States. The battle of Gettysburg had more dead in one day than in the Korean, War, the Viet Nam War. (Fifty-eight thousand (58,000) Americans.)
Do we hold a memorial for those dead? Perhaps somewhere in Pennsylvania, but not in our reverie. So, you see, June 6th, came and went, but, I am sure Al Fabricatore, (of the Construction shop, as I was reminded) landed on Omaha Beach. So, June 6th is personal to him, and the others of CBS that participated, on that date.
Instead of carrying a camera on my shoulder anymore, I wear a baseball style hat, emblazoned with gold lettering, proclaiming that I too, am one of those almost forgotten, PLAYERS WITHOUT LINES. Most people, I feel silently say to themselves, "Thanks Grandpa, for what ever it was you did for our country."
Thanks, Tom Hanks; at least most people remember you gave your life trying to save, "Private Ryan," on June 6th, 1944.
Hooyah,
Tony C.